GRI Index


Norfolk Southern declares that this report complies with the Global Reporting Initiative’s 3.1 Level C reporting standards.

partially reported

fully reported

profile disclosures

Strategy and Analysis

Profile Disclosure
Description
Reported
Cross-reference/Direct answer
1.1
Statement from the most senior decision-maker of the organization.
1.2
Description of key impacts, risks, and opportunities.

Organizational Profile

Profile Disclosure
Description
Reported
Cross-reference/Direct answer
2.1
Name of the organization.
Norfolk Southern Corporation
2.2
Primary brands, products, and/or services.
2.3
Operational structure of the organization, including main divisions, operating companies, subsidiaries, and joint ventures.
2.4
Location of organization's headquarters.
Three Commercial Place, Norfolk, VA
2.5
Number of countries where the organization operates, and names of countries with either major operations or that are specifically relevant to the sustainability issues covered in the report.
2.6
Nature of ownership and legal form.
2.7
Markets served (including geographic breakdown, sectors served, and types ofcustomers/beneficiaries).
2.8
Scale of the reporting organization.
2.9
Significant changes during the reporting period regarding size, structure, or ownership.
There were no significant changes due to NSC's size, structure orownership in 2012.
2.10
Awards received in the reporting period.

Report Parameters

Profile Disclosure
Description
Reported
Cross-reference/Direct answer
3.1
Reporting period (e.g., fiscal/calendar year) for information provided.
3.2
Date of most recent previous report (if any).
Norfolk Southern issued its last sustainability report in November 2012.
3.3
Reporting cycle (annual, biennial, etc.)
Annual
3.4
Contact point for questions regarding the report or its contents.
3.5
Process for defining report content.
3.6
Boundary of the report (e.g., countries, divisions, subsidiaries, leased facilities,joint ventures, suppliers). See GRI Boundary Protocol for further guidance.
About Our Report and Sustainability Reporting; NS Corp.'s report focuses primarily on NSC and the operations and major operating subsidiary, Norfolk Southern Railway Company. The financial and greenhouse gas data referenced encompass the activities of NSC's majority-owned and controlled subsidiaries.
3.7
State any specific limitations on the scope or boundary of the report (see completeness principle for explanation of scope)
Our report, which is self-declared GRI level C, covers our wholly-owned global operations. We work with partners to build strategic partnerships to broaden our sustainability knowledge. Since we do not own these external organizations, we cannot include their full activities and results in this report.
3.8
Basis for reporting on joint ventures, subsidiaries, leased facilities, outsourced operations, and other entities that can significantly affect comparability from period to period and/or between organizations.
See Standard Disclosures 3.6 and 3.7
3.9
Data measurement techniques and the bases of calculations, including assumptions and techniques underlying estimations applied to the compilation of the Indicators and other information in the report. Explain any decisions not to apply, or to substantially diverge from, the GRI Indicator Protocols.
For measurement of our GHG performance, please go to Solid Progress.
3.10
Explanation of the effect of any re-statements of information provided in earlier reports, and the reasons for such re-statement (e.g.,mergers/acquisitions, change of base years/periods, nature of business, measurement methods).
There are no restatements in the current report.
3.11
Significant changes from previous reporting periods in the scope, boundary, or measurement methods applied in the report.
3.12
Table identifying the location of the Standard Disclosures in the report.
GRI Index
3.13
Policy and current practice with regard to seeking external assurance for the report.

Governance, Commitments, and Engagements

Profile Disclosure
Description
Reported
Cross-reference/Direct answer
4.1
Governance structure of the organization, including committees under the highest governance body responsible for specific tasks, such as setting strategy or organizational oversight.
Pages 17-21 of DEF14A
4.2
Indicate whether the Chair of the highest governance body is also an executive officer.
Page 18 of DEF14A
4.3
For organizations that have a unitary board structure, state the number and gender of members of the highest governance body that are independent and/or non-executive members.
Pages 6-10 of DEF14A
4.4
Mechanisms for shareholders and employees to provide recommendations or direction to the highest governance body.
Page 34 of DEF14A
4.5
Linkage between compensation for members of the highest governance body, senior managers, and executives (including departure arrangements), and the organization's performance (including social and environmental performance).
4.6
Processes in place for the highest governance body to ensure conflicts of interest are avoided.
4.7
Process for determining the composition, qualifications, and expertise of the members of the highest governance body and its committees, including any consideration of gender and other indicators of diversity.
4.8
Internally developed statements of mission or values, codes of conduct, and principles relevant to economic, environmental, and social performance and the status of their implementation.
4.9
Procedures of the highest governance body for overseeing the organization's identification and management of economic, environmental, and social performance, including relevant risks and opportunities, and adherence or compliance with internationally agreed standards, codes of conduct, and principles.
4.10
Processes for evaluating the highest governance body's own performance, particularly with respect to economic, environmental, and social performance.
4.11
Explanation of whether and how the precautionary approach or principle is addressed by the organization.
4.12
Externally developed economic, environmental, and social charters, principles, or other initiatives to which the organization subscribes or endorses.
4.13
Memberships in associations (such as industry associations) and/or national/international advocacy organizations in which the organization: * Has positions in governance bodies; * Participates in projects or committees; * Provides substantive funding beyond routine membership dues; or * Views membership as strategic.
4.14
List of stakeholder groups engaged by the organization.
4.15
Basis for identification and selection of stakeholders with whom to engage.
4.16
Approaches to stakeholder engagement, including frequency of engagement by type and by stakeholder group.
4.17
Key topics and concerns that have been raised through stakeholder engagement, and how the organization has responded to those key topics and concerns, including through its reporting.
performance indicators

Economic

Profile Disclosure
Description
Reported
Cross-reference/Direct answer
EC1
Direct economic value generated and distributed, including revenues, operating costs, employee compensation, donations and other community investments, retained earnings, and payments to capital providers and governments.
EC2
Financial implications and other risks and opportunities for the organization's activities due to climate change.
Page K-14 of 2012 10-K
EC3
Coverage of the organization's defined benefit plan obligations.
EC4
Significant financial assistance received from government.
EC5
Range of ratios of standard entry level wage by gender compared to local minimum wage at significant locations of operation.
EC6
Policy, practices, and proportion of spending on locally-based suppliers at significant locations of operation.
EC7
Procedures for local hiring and proportion of senior management hired from the local community at significant locations of operation.
EC8
Development and impact of infrastructure investments and services provided primarily for public benefit through commercial, in-kind, or pro bono engagement.
EC9
Understanding and describing significant indirect economic impacts, including the extent of impacts.

Environmental

Profile Disclosure
Description
Reported
Cross-reference/Direct answer
EN1
Materials used by weight or volume.
EN2
Percentage of materials used that are recycled input materials.
EN3
Direct energy consumption by primary energy source.
EN4
Indirect energy consumption by primary source.
EN5
Energy saved due to conservation and efficiency improvements.
EN6
Initiatives to provide energy-efficient or renewable energy based products and services, and reductions in energy requirements as a result of these initiatives.
EN7
Initiatives to reduce indirect energy consumption and reductions achieved.
EN8
Total water withdrawal by source.
957,259,000 gallons total water withdrawn
EN9
Water sources significantly affected by withdrawal of water.
EN10
Percentage and total volume of water recycled and reused.
EN11
Location and size of land owned, leased, managed in, or adjacent to, protected areas and areas of high biodiversity value outside protected areas.
EN12
Description of significant impacts of activities, products, and services on biodiversity in protected areas and areas of high biodiversity value outside protected areas.
EN13
Habitats protected or restored.
See EN11
EN14
Strategies, current actions, and future plans for managing impacts on biodiversity.
See EN11
EN15
Number of IUCN Red List species and national conservation list species with habitats in areas affected by operations, by level of extinction risk.
EN16
Total direct and indirect greenhouse gas emissions by weight.
EN17
Other relevant indirect greenhouse gas emissions by weight.
EN18
Initiatives to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and reductions achieved.
EN19
Emissions of ozone-depleting substances by weight.
EN20
NOx, SOx, and other significant air emissions by type and weight.
EN21
Total water discharge by quality and destination.
694,501,000 gallons of water discharged to the sewer.
EN22
Total weight of waste by type and disposal method.
EN23
Total number and volume of significant spills.
There were three significant hazardous material releases in 2012: 22,500 gallons of molten sulfur in Ligonier, Ind. on March 27; 53,047 gallons of ethanol in Columbus, Ohio, on July 11; and 1,600 gallons of ethanol in Mt. Vernon, Ill., on Dec. 30. Significant spills or releases are defined as hazardous material releases of 10,000 pounds/10,000 gallons or more or petroleum spills of more than 10,000 gallons.
EN24
Weight of transported, imported, exported, or treated waste deemed hazardous under the terms of the Basel Convention Annex I, II, III, and VIII, and percentage of transported waste shipped internationally.
EN25
Identity, size, protected status, and biodiversity value of water bodies and related habitats significantly affected by the reporting organization's discharges of water and runoff.
EN26
Initiatives to mitigate environmental impacts of products and services, and extent of impact mitigation.
EN27
Percentage of products sold and their packaging materials that are reclaimed by category.
As a freight transportation provider, NS is not in the business of manufacturing products for sale.
EN28
Monetary value of significant fines and total number of non-monetary sanctions for non-compliance with environmental laws and regulations.
EN29
Significant environmental impacts of transporting products and other goods and materials used for the organization's operations, and transporting members of the workforce.
EN30
Total environmental protection expenditures and investments by type.

Social: Labor Practices and Decent Work

Profile Disclosure
Description
Reported
Cross-reference/Direct answer
LA1
Total workforce by employment type, employment contract, and region, broken down by gender.
LA2
Total number and rate of new employee hires and employee turnover by age group, gender, and region.
LA3
Benefits provided to full-time employees that are not provided to temporary or part-time employees, by major operations.
LA4
Percentage of employees covered by collective bargaining agreements.
LA5
Minimum notice period(s) regarding significant operational changes, including whether it is specified in collective agreements.
LA6
Percentage of total workforce represented in formal joint management-worker health and safety committees that help monitor and advise on occupational health and safety programs.
LA7
Rates of injury, occupational diseases, lost days, and absenteeism, and number of work-related fatalities by region and by gender.
LA8
Education, training, counseling, prevention, and risk-control programs in place to assist workforce members, their families, or community members regarding serious diseases.
LA9
Health and safety topics covered in formal agreements with trade unions.
LA10
Average hours of training per year per employee by gender, and by employee category.
LA11
Programs for skills management and lifelong learning that support the continued employability of employees and assist them in managing career endings.
LA12
Percentage of employees receiving regular performance and career development reviews, by gender.
LA13
Composition of governance bodies and breakdown of employees per employee category according to gender, age group, minority group membership, and other indicators of diversity.
Pages 6-10 of DEF14A
LA14
Ratio of basic salary and remuneration of women to men by employee category, by significant locations of operation.
LA15
Return to work and retention rates after parental leave, by gender.

Social: Human Rights

Profile Disclosure
Description
Reported
Cross-reference/Direct answer
HR1
Percentage and total number of significant investment agreements and contracts that include clauses incorporating human rights concerns, or that have undergone human rights screening.
HR2
Percentage of significant suppliers, contractors and other business partners that have undergone human rights screening, and actions taken.
HR3
Total hours of employee training on policies and procedures concerning aspects of human rights that are relevant to operations, including the percentage of employees trained.
HR4
Total number of incidents of discrimination and corrective actions taken.
HR5
Operations and significant suppliers identified in which the right to exercise freedom of association and collective bargaining may be violated or at significant risk, and actions taken to support these rights.
HR6
Operations and significant suppliers identified as having significant risk for incidents of child labor, and measures taken to contribute to the effective abolition of child labor.
While we are not aware of any significant risk factors in our operations, NS Corporation always ensures that its operations comply with applicable laws and regulations, and upholds the highest integrity standards, as outlined in The Thoroughbred Code of Ethics.
HR7
Operations and significant suppliers identified as having significant risk for incidents of forced or compulsory labor, and measures to contribute to the elimination of all forms of forced or compulsory labor.
While we are not aware of any significant risk factors in our operations, NS Corporation always ensures that its operations comply with applicable laws and regulations, and upholds the highest integrity standards, as outlined in The Thoroughbred Code of Ethics.
HR8
Percentage of security personnel trained in the organization's policies or procedures concerning aspects of human rights that are relevant to operations.
HR9
Total number of incidents of violations involving rights of indigenous people and actions taken.
HR10
Percentage and total number of operations that have been subject to human rights reviews and/or impact assessments.
HR11
"Number of grievances related to human rights filed, addressed and resolved through formal grievance mechanisms."

Social: Society

Profile Disclosure
Description
Reported
Cross-reference/Direct answer
SO1
Percentage of operations with implemented local community engagement, impact assessments, and development programs.
SO2
Percentage and total number of business units analyzed for risks related to corruption.
SO3
Percentage of employees trained in organization's anti-corruption policies and procedures.
SO4
Actions taken in response to incidents of corruption.
SO5
Public policy positions and participation in public policy development and lobbying.
SO6
Total value of financial and in-kind contributions to political parties, politicians, and related institutions by country.
SO7
Total number of legal actions for anti-competitive behavior, anti-trust, and monopoly practices and their outcomes.
SO8
Monetary value of significant fines and total number of non-monetary sanctions for non-compliance with laws and regulations.
SO9
Operations with significant potential or actual negative impacts on local communities.
SO10
Prevention and mitigation measures implemented in operations with significant potential or actual negative impacts on local communities.

Social: Product Responsibility

Profile Disclosure
Description
Reported
Cross-reference/Direct answer
PR1
Life cycle stages in which health and safety impacts of products and services are assessed for improvement, and percentage of significant products and services categories subject to such procedures.
PR2
Total number of incidents of non-compliance with regulations and voluntary codes concerning health and safety impacts of products and services during their life cycle, by type of outcomes.
PR3
Type of product and service information required by procedures, and percentage of significant products and services subject to such information requirements.
PR4
Total number of incidents of non-compliance with regulations and voluntary codes concerning product and service information and labeling, by type of outcomes.
PR5
Practices related to customer satisfaction, including results of surveys measuring customer satisfaction.
PR6
Programs for adherence to laws, standards, and voluntary codes related to marketing communications, including advertising, promotion, and sponsorship.
PR7
Total number of incidents of non-compliance with regulations and voluntary codes concerning marketing communications, including advertising, promotion, and sponsorship by type of outcomes.
PR8
Total number of substantiated complaints regarding breaches of customer privacy and losses of customer data.
PR9
Monetary value of significant fines for non-compliance with laws and regulations concerning the provision and use of products and services.
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sustainability in action:

Creative thinking reduces energy use – and costs

Through our InnovatioNS program, Norfolk Southern encourages employees to look for ways to make their work safer, more efficient, and more cost effective. Brian Thomas’ ingenuity has saved the company money and contributed to its sustainability efforts. read more >

sustainability in action:

Committed to a greener workplace

Employees at Norfolk Southern have embraced the railroad’s sustainability efforts. At many locations across the system, employees such as Emily Hunter have taken the initiative to launch recycling and other green initiatives. read more >

sustainability in action:

A Norfolk Southern ‘River Star’

Ray Jones, a 32-year railroader, is committed to helping Norfolk Southern meet its pledge to be a good corporate neighbor and environmental steward. read more >

Creative thinking reduces energy use – and costs

>

Committed to a greener workplace

>

A Norfolk Southern ‘River Star’

>

See all of our sustainability in action case studies

sustainability in action:

Keeping locomotives moving down the track

Norfolk Southern is continually looking for ways to increase the efficiency and productivity of operations. Devina Miller has played a key role in a Mechanical Department initiative dubbed Mission Critical. read more >

Keeping locomotives moving down the track

>

See all of our sustainability in action case studies

sustainability in action:

A little effort, a lot of food for those in need

To strengthen the communities our railroad serves, Norfolk Southern promotes and supports employee volunteerism. Many employees, like Amanda Carpenter, volunteer their time, treasure, and talents to build community connections. read more >

sustainability in action:

Building community partnerships

Norfolk Southern strives to be a good corporate citizen. The railroad routinely partners with local, state, and federal government officials on projects that benefit communities and the country. Employees such as Ed Sites and David Dize are the ones who make these partnerships work. read more >

sustainability in action:

In pursuit of a dream

Norfolk Southern ensures that employees have ample opportunities to develop their skills and advance their careers. Jerome Perry is taking advantage of an NS program to further his education. read more >

sustainability in action:

Where good health meets good deeds

As part of its employee wellness program, dubbed WellNS, Norfolk Southern in 2011 introduced Power Train, an initiative that combines physical fitness and charitable giving. Misty Braden organized a Power Train team in Knoxville to help fund breast cancer research after a colleague was diagnosed with the disease. read more >

sustainability in action:

Partnering for safety

Safely operating our railroad is Norfolk Southern’s No. 1 priority. In addition to efforts to keep our employees safe on the job, we partner with communities in various ways to promote public safety. Employees Richard Vaughan and Greg Valentine demonstrate that commitment. read more >

A little effort, a lot of food for those in need

>

Building community partnerships

>

In pursuit of a dream

>

Where good health meets good deeds

>

Partnering for safety

>

See all of our sustainability in action case studies